Take me to the Bed Cave!

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Would you believe that this intriguing bookshelf/igloo not only stores books, but also a bed?!

It would be like a cross between one of those forts you created as a child by tearing apart the couch and making your own little play nook cave, and your own personal library. Truth be told, the Uroko bed (by Point Architects)was actually intended for children, but it seems like a pretty swell grown-up double duty bed. I know I certainly need a bigger bookshelf, and this one is handy since it stores your books, reading materials, knick knacks, etc. and also puts them all right within arms reach. It would make a great room divider should you live in an extra large multi-purpose room/studio type scenario and it would be pretty darned swell in one of the many loft-style apartments here in Brooklyn. One of those places you walk into and they pull a curtain aside point in and say “hey, this would be your room”. True story, it happened to my friend. Naturally, she said no thanks and ducked out of there quickly as possible. The idea of a curtained off room, or room with little to no privacy is certainly unappealing, but I’d certainly ponder it if I could have a little book cave of my own.

Imagine all the ways you could decorate it! While it’s shown with the all of those felt shingles, it’s essentially a basic curved sort of bookcase room which makes the decorating possibilities fairly endless:

You can create your own little world.

At the very least it would be an interesting idea to have bookshelf walls. If I remember correctly, in Jonathon Safran Foer’s book Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, there was an outdoor study where the walls were made of books. Holy guacamole! I found that one bit with only a moment of searching:

“The first time Anna and I made love was behind her father’s shed, the previous owner had been a farmer, but Dresden started to overtake the surrounding villages and the farm was divided into nine plots of land, Anna’s family owned the largest. The walls of the shed collapsed one autumn afternoon – “a leaf too many,” her father joked – and the next day he made new shelves, so that the books themselves would separate inside from outside. (The new overhanging roof protected to books from rain, but during winter the pages would freeze together, come spring they let out a sigh.) He made a little saloon out of the place, carpets, two small couches, he loved to go out there in the evening with a glass of whiskey and a pipe, and take down books and look through the wall at the center of the city. He was an intellectual, although he wasn’t important, maybe he would have been important in life if he had lived longer, maybe great books were coiled within him like springs, books that could have separated inside from outside.” (126)

Spotted on Inhabitots

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