All the scraps of paper

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The other day I managed to dash out of the apartment sans Hubert the iPhone. I didn’t realize I didn’t have my handy-dandy everything tool until I was already waiting on the platform for the L train. Pity for poor Tilly; I’d have to go without.

I missed knowing what time it was (though it really wasn’t a big deal, actually). I missed being able to see my new emails (I love mail). I missed checking Facebook continuously. I had things to tweet! I found pictures I wanted to take! I wanted to know if the temperature had dropped a degree or two so that I would know if I need my extra cardigan before I ventured back outdoors! Of course, I missed a few calls, too.

But. It got me thinking; mostly when during my periodicals perusing I saw a quote I wanted to post onto my newly acquired Tumble account (look how with it I am!), and when I saw a necklace whose designers name I wanted to jot down in my phone’s notebook file, as I often do, to check out later. Because for the quote, I found it immediately acceptible and a natural reaction to write it down on paper. I reached for the notebook I sometimes carry around for random jottings-down and realized it was not there (!), so I used an old unused envelope lurking in my Mary-Poppins style bag.

I wrote down the quote. I wrote down the designer’s name. And then I started pondering the writen vs. the typed word. I like words, and I like to write. I started to ponder about what I write where.

– I have a journal, an other person quote/poem book, a my poem book, and a design journal. I do all these by hand.

– I have this blog (and I’ve had other personal ones, too, in the past), twitter, tumblr, facebook, myspace, flickr, open blank word documents (writing poetry/prose/articles)/mail “drafts” (for jotting down notes), and Adobe Creative Suite. All of these I do digitally. (Naturally)

Some of these I’ve only started doing recently. I find the iPhone handy for jotting things down because otherwise my purse ends up filled with random bits of paper. A spare notepad is handy for those sorts of things; but I already carry around so many bigg-ish things in my bag (the journal, design journal, often a book or two), that I am dubious of adding another. Though sometimes I do anyway. Though continued technology whatnots might change that, as it changes everything. I’ve wondered if I had one of those smaller, skinny, lightweight laptops I’d just pop that open and type everything. I suppose it could be easily organized that way? How many people do that?

And then I worried about handwriting. I like handwritten things. I love snail mail (I hang it on my wall! ((letters, that is – not bills)). There’s something increasingly personal about little hand-written notes. Are we going to become completely digital?

Do you think better when you write with your hands or type with your fingers? It’s probably different kinds of thought, yes? Maybe? I know, I like to be able to type something when I want to get it out quickly because I think I can type faster than I write. But, I like how in my journal, the writing is a part of the story. Sometimes the writing is smaller and neater and close together; sometimes it’s larger and messier and bobbles around the (unlined) pages; sometimes a combination of those. I like being able to add a doodle. Embellish.

Do you like your pictures digitally displayed in albums? Or tangible ones you can hold?

Is it better or worse and where will lines be drawn in terms of what we share online. What people care about.

And:

Can we ever be truly connected and informed and on top of everything going on everywhere. Read all of the news and the blogs and blog it yourself before it’s old news and everyone who’s anyone already knows about it. Does it foster or hinder actual, individual thought? Creativity? Are we going to be too “book smart”; popping out factoids you read about here or there. Is everything speeding up so much that we forget to think, and forget to truly engage in the everyday? (I love the computer, but I also love to wander around the city and people watch, etc)

Or course, the internet and technology helps all of that, too, by making it easier for like-minded people to connect. We tire of mass-produced everything, so we create things by hand (crafty-ness!) and sell them on craft-havens like Etsy.

I just find the ways/changing way/future way we interact with technology to be rather fascinating.

That being said: Have you ever wanted to just reach into the computer screen and start fiddling with things by hand?

Oh. And going off the grid didn’t kill me. Though I did feel kind of (even more) naked when my iPod, Giacomo, died mid-wander.

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One response »

  1. Not getting news updates every two seconds doesn’t make you dumber or slower. It gives you time to think. Like you did. I never leave the house without my iPhone, either, but I have confined some of my apps to computer-use only. Facebook and Twitter stay at home.

    But here is a fun exercise. We think of constantly checking on Facebook, Twitter and blog stats as news updates. But it’s just a habit. Quick, what are your latest blog stats–don’t check! What were they last time you looked? You don’t remember. I don’t either.

    So a few days ago, I went out and started an exercise. A sketch a day of ordinary things. Not a photo, a sketch. I’m not an artist, but I can look at things carefully.
    My world is changing because I notice. I see. I pay attention. Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr allow us NOT to pay attention. Updates are always there.

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