Tag Archives: art

Love is a fire

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This is made by Pei-San Ng out of 2,500 match sticks. When I look at it, I think about how interesting it would be to set it on fire. And then I remember this little quip:

“Love is a fire. But whether it is going to warm your heart or burn down your house you can never tell.” – Joan Crawford.

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Not all that’s broken is as it seams

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This charming but dark little animation is about a determined little seamstress who tries to repair the world from the damages of war with her trusty needle and thread. Her stitches are beautiful and delicate in their strength to fix things, but just how stable are they?

Trois Petits Points (Three Dots) was created by students from GOBELINS, l’école de l’image: Lucrèce Andreae, Alice Dieudonne, Tracy Nowocien, Florian Parrot, Ornélie Prioul, and Rémy Schaepman.

(love the murky, muted color palette) (( one day soon, my darlings, i will write you a nice longer post :))

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Mixed and Pieces

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So, if you look at fashion magazines, you may have noticed the trend/tendency/encouragement to mix patterns when dressing. (I totally support this, as I’ve been doing it a while and it can be a lot of fun – see last year’s post)((hmm, maybe I’ll do a post on fashion mixing, a la the serious dress post… Maybe?)). But lately in my magical cruisings throughout the fantastical internet world, I’ve found some interesting examples of “patterns” being mixed up and combined to intriguing results in other mediums.

Loom:
Here we have the Hepsi series of rugs from Loom. These rugs are pieced together from fragments of a variety of kinds of vintage rugs. Pretty gorgeous, aren’t they?


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Kent Rogowski:

Forty store bought puzzles were purchased, mixed up, and pieced together into stunningly abstracted landscapes by Kent Rogowski in his Love=Love series.


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Matthew Cusick:
Antique maps pieced together to create phenomenal collages and paintings by Matthew Cusick

Serge Mendzhiyskogo:
Cityscapes presented through a collage of hundreds of photo pieced together, created a surreal, abstracted perspective.


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You guys can consider yourself lucky that I have a (and have had a perpetual) headache, which is impeding my desire to write some long thoughts on the meanings of all of this pattern mixing and abstractions in fashion, art, etc. So, in short, it makes me think of the chaos and uncertainties of life; how often we feel many things at once, and our lives and relationships and wants and desires can often tend to be more complex, layered, and not as cut and dry as we would like to think. The paths to the things we desire can often and easily veer into uncertain territory, especially Right Now. But, the thing is, that often it’s the complexities and layers of life, the crazy and convoluted journeys we take, that make life so wonderful and beautiful if you can step back and appreciate it as such. Perhaps this thought has been absorbed into society, the fear and beauty of it expressed in our clothes, on our walls, or on our floors as a sort of acceptance of uncertainty. A sort of heart on our sleeve expression of our frustrations turned into something beautiful. Perhaps it will linger as a mark in design history of these feelings.

hello, lover(s)

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Frankly, I’m a little bit in love with Wendy Chidester‘s exquisite paintings that bring old, worn, out of date objects into a new, bright, and warmly vibrant light. I love the quasi simplicity; how, all all of vivid details and colors call to mind a portrait. You can’t help but look at these and think about the lives these objects have lived, the hands that have touched them, they stories they could tell. Or maybe you’re just entranced by the intricate charm and elegance we gave to everyday objects – at least a different sort than proliferates today.

They remind me a touch, but differently of Charlotte Beaundry’s trophy paintings I posted about over a year ago (here)

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The Dying Swan

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Isn’t Anna Pavlova lovely? (I tried some magic code to shorten the video so that it would start just when she began to dance, but apparently the code doesn’t like me because it refuses to work. Oh bother)

I was watching a short clip of an interview (long ((enough)) after her death, I believe) with someone who knew who Anna well. The duo ruminated on how she was such a wonderful and unique and captivating dancer, and they touched upon her limited technique and how considering the “dancer’s of today” she might never have made it so big.  It had to be mentioned, and though they went back to remark on her passion, her presence, and how there was something different and ineffable about her performance, I couldn’t help but think, how true.

The thought occurs to me most every time I look at dancers of the past. The bar of technique and athleticism and perfection has risen to such an incredible degree throughout the years. I find it dually wonderful and a little sad. Perfection. Passion. What if you have the passion but not the perfection? What if you have the perfection but not the passion? What if there are scores of Anna Pavlova’s (in any art form or field) held back by a lack of textbook all-around perfection? And, while I’m wielding a double edged sword (being a perfectionist and all), what if we’re missing something really great by only looking for “perfect”. Doesn’t that, after a while, get a little boring?

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Olly Olly Oxen Free!

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When Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland came out in March, there was an absurd amount of Alice in Wonderland themed works in pretty much every medium imaginable. I can’t lie, it got a bit tiresome. A bit overdone. I’ve been getting a bit annoyed about the degree of stuff surrounding films like this one and Where the Wild Things Are. I mean, a lot of it is lovely, but there gets to be that point of over-saturation where you might see something really fabulous and still a part of you is wondering really? more?!

Seriously. I can get a little bit crazy. But I was shuffled off to this lovely poster by one Olly Moss and thought it quite perfect. Maybe it’s just because it’s from one of the favorite bits of the film, with all of the magical shrinking and growing. And then, of course, how it’s anything but overdone. It’s simplicity is refreshing. And when I hunted down his site, that’s what I found in all of his work. Perfectly cheeky and witty and delightful without heaps over thought farce.

Look! My initials! Slipped into a belt and a pair of scissors. (haha, I’m imagining an image of the scissors cutting into the belt, or maybe just tucked into it sort of handy(wo)man style. Maybe there could be an “i” perhaps as a needle tucked in, too, to account for the middle name)

There was a lot of Lost work out there. I like this one because it reminds me of an old movie poster (a bit like Hitchkock’s Vertigo, perhaps). And then, of course, this awesome reaction to the “Keep Calm and Carry On” poster/phrase craze of not-long-ago (even I mentioned them). Granted, I’m usually a bit more likely to panic and freak out. At least before I manage to shut myself up enough to calm down and carry on. I should like to see the two hanging side by side. Because sometimes you just need to freak out a little bit. Even if only for a few minutes.

(Seriously. Like the time almost two years ago when I found out I had about two days to get ready to move, and I was eventually struck with the horrors of oh-my-heavens-when-on-earth-did-i-get-so-much-stuff-and-how-in-the-hell-am-i-supposed-to-move-all-of-this reality and subsequently panicked. I’m pretty sure I sat on my bed and shook and cried as I eyed the catastrophe that was my room, and I tried to make myself shut up but it didn’t work. So. I resolved that I could panic as long as I was being productive at the same time. And I wound up sobbing and packing at the same time. It must have been quite a sight. But I moved!)

Ahem. Moving on.

Get to work! Or not.

Well I just like these. Because, well, maybe you should make something cool everyday. And the lobster is just awesome.

Olly Moss:
site
Flickr
Alice Poster

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