Tag Archives: contemporary ballet

The Grey Area

Standard

This portion of The Grey Area choreographed by David Dawson captured my attention a good few years ago and mesmerized me completely. I’d saved it as a favorite, but at some point in time it mysteriously disappeared and I’ve hunted for it here and there ever since. So I was relieved to have finally found it again, so that I could watch it and become drawn into the dancers incredibly fluid and organic movements once more. And it was just as enchanting as I remembered, this dialogue between two people who just happen to be classically trained ballet dancers. What I love about this piece is the way that it sort of strips away the hardcore, fine-tuned, precise sort of technique of classical ballet and turns it into a modern, incredibly organic, and emotive sort of piece. It’s almost as if a relationship was taken and it’s conversations were stripped of words so that there was only the movement to express yourself. As though you are watching a conversation/interaction between lovers.. the agreements, the arguments, the familiarity, the making up, the indecision, the soft words with the mute button on. And I love how they keep dancing as the curtains slowly descend, reminding that though we’re usually given an “end” to a story, it still goes on (somewhere).

If you enjoyed this, and even if you just enjoy ballet/dance and/or are curious about it and the process behind the creation of a dance, I would highly recommend the video on the making of the 3 part ballet. I watched all three portions (each 10 minutes) of the documentary and enjoyed it immensely. It’s very well done. Portions one, two, and three. Go!

Bookmark and Share add to Technorati Favorites

Advertisements

Amelia Waits

Standard

Stumbled upon this mesmerizing clip from the ballet film Amelia (2002), performed by the ballet company La La La Human Steps and choreographed by Edouard Lock. The score is comprised of lyrics from Velvet Underground(!) songs (i.e Lou Reed)  combined with violin, cello, and piano arrangements written by David Lang; this particular portion uses the song “Waiting for my Man”. A commenter on neatorama who saw Amelia performed live (it really is that fast!) says the piece is “essentially about the nature of love, and the increasingly blurred divide between the human and the artificial and how that affects our ability to love and be loved”.

My interest has certainly been piqued after reading more about it (and just finding out it was an entire 130 minute film!), and I’m curious and itching to see the whole film.

I’m also aching for my pointe shoes (this always happens after I’ve watched a dance performance), and intrigued about this company. Seems like it’d sure be fun to dance with them! Apparently, in another portion of this film there is a pas de deux where both dancers (one man and one women) are dressed as men and both are on pointe!

Bookmark and Share add to Technorati Favorites