Tag Archives: sculpture

Can you say bird?

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So. You know I cruise around the blogosphere a lot right? Sometimes I wonder if I’m becoming a bit too good at it… because sometimes I find myself mentally yawning and thinking oh, i’ve seen that already. and that. and that, too.

I guess that’s what happens. And I’m good at spotting the way things will makes their way around the internet. And other little internet trends. And over the past month-or-so-ish I’ve been noticing little fabric/handmade birds. It’s not like it’s huge or anything, I just noticed two different handmade little art birdies featured in one day, and every now and then I spot another, and for some reason it made a little tick in my head and I saved a few of them.

I’m not a bird sculpture freak, but I’m curious about this apparent spreading little interest in them. There was a little birdie trend not so long ago…. in jewelry, and prints. I’ve always liked them. I have a really rad little bird necklace my bestie got for me for my birthday. So yes. Birds. Handmade. Crocheted. Etc. LOOK!

Louise Weaver

spotted via

Abby Glassenberg

spotted via

Abigail Brown

spotted via

Lauren Alane


spotted via

They are all lovely, aren’t they? Maybe we like birds because of their wings. Because they can fly away at will. And we relate, sometimes, to feeling caged.

But birds are such beautiful colorful, hopeful creatures. And they can sing. Even if they’re caged.

I know why the caged bird sings

A free bird leaps on the back of the wind
and floats downstream till the current ends
and dips his wing in the orange suns rays and dares to claim the sky.

But a bird that stalks down his narrow cage
can seldom see through his bars of rage
his wings are clipped and his feet are tied so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings with a fearful trill
of things unknown but longed for still
and his tune is heard on the distant hill
for the caged bird sings of freedom.

The free bird thinks of another breeze
and the trade winds soft through the sighing trees
and the fat worms waiting on a dawn-bright lawn and he names the sky his own.

But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams
his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
his wings are clipped and his feet are tied so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings with a fearful trill
of things unknown but longed for still
and his tune is heard on the distant hill
for the caged bird sings of freedom.

-Maya Angelou

(Don’t mind me, my mind runs in tangents)

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Searching for a pea in a clothes-stack

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Jarod Charzewski:

I came across Jarod Charzewski and Derick Melander‘s work recently, and was at first stuck by the array of colors and textures produced from all of the layers and layers of second hand clothing compiled into art. Both artist’s work intends to call to mind how clothes are a part of our life stories, a part of our personal landscape; and also how much waste we produce. These are all second hand and donated clothes, and it’s very easy to see just by walking into any thrift store just much unwanted and unused clothing there is out there. You can see it just by looking into your own closet. I know I personally have a ton of clothes I no longer wear for a number of reasons.

They start to create mountains in my own room, start to creep into corners and crevices. I don’t know what to do with them all sometimes. Yet, I know I still wouldn’t hate new things (or new to me). These clothes I don’t wear, some are just not “me” anymore. Wearing them feels like masquerading as a past version of myself. At the same time I’m wary both of buying more, and of my role as a designer, when I think about all those clothes that go unsold and end up in the trash. We’re consumers, but so much is often produced by the glut of clothing manufacturers that there are no homes for them all. No real use (unless, maybe, more people ship them to countries where people don’t have enough – which already happens to an extent). They take over. They take up space. Clothes are a part of our personal history, but they also create waste. They become a part of a physical landscape.

Derick Melander:

They also, more whimsically, remind me a bit of the fairy-tale of The Princess and the Pea, where a young woman arrives on a prince’s doorstep soaked from a storm and claims to be princess (with no on-hand proof) seeking a place to stay for the night is put to a test (unbeknownst to her) by being required to sleep atop 20 mattresses under which a single pea rests. The idea being that only a princess would be sensitive enough to feel a tiny little pea from underneath so many layers and therefore experience a terrible night’s sleep.

Perhaps someone should create a new fairy-tale of sorts… a kind of merging and melding of The Princess and the Pea and the early 90’s quest to save a rain forest fairy tale (with literal fairies) Fern Gully. Maybe it would be about something like a world after we’ve become so overcome with trash…but in this world the trash and excess has been merged artfully “beautifully” into the landscape… eventually overtaking it. Clothes mountains….newspaper buildings, etc. They’ve replaced the real thing, and it’s interesting to look at, and people forget the real trees and nature and so on and just accept this pseudo man-made nature. But maybe there’s a girl so sensitive she can feel a lone (some kind of) plant seed buried beneath…maybe she digs it up and has no idea what it is… and goes on some sort of quest to find out. But the world has covered our past of natural trees and mountains and etc up. So it’s quite a task. Quite a task indeed.

I shall have to think more about this possible story. Hmm.

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But your skin is like porcelain

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Stumbled upon Li Xiaofeng‘s gorgeous porcelain dresses a few weeks ago and have been itching to show them to you all ever since. I find them very striking, in how something so hard and sharp as ceramic shards could manage to look so soft when utilized in a dress. The patterns on the traditional chinese porcelain almost look like embroidery, albeit exceptionally bright and potent in their color and shapes; the variety of shape used gives a patchworked sort of feel, but there’s that interesting discongruity in how each piece of ceramic maintains a shape that gives “patchwork” a whole other dimension (as opposed to flat pieces of fabric pieced together to form a 3-D shape). They’re dresses that look particularly alive in a way.

(imagine all of the family dinners, and teas, and stories that have been told in each objects presence!)

Although Mr. Xiafeng’s clothes were created a few years a go, I feel they hold a particularly poignant timeliness to the present. When I saw them, I thought about Sarah’s Smash Shack which I wrote about this past January. Basically, you can go there and take your aggression out on ceramic and glass objects. I think all of us, at some point, and especially in the past year or two would really like to break something out of frustration. At the same time, people have been trying to be happy with less, spending more time with families and loved ones in a pared down existence, trying to foster kindness and giving. Trying to be optimistic. And of course all of this has entailed picking up the pieces of the things that have been broken and creating something new from them. And these dresses take something beautiful and traditional and done some new and modern with them, while still allowing you to feel a sense of the history, the background from which they came.

Carry on!

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Wearable Ar(t)chitecture

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Not too long ago, April in fact, I was perusing through Wallpaper magazine when I stumbled upon an article about architect Bart Prince. It made me a little giddy inside, with all of those gorgeous organic undulating wavy-esque organic type curves. So, dorkily, I snapped pics with my phone with the intent to look more up on Mr. Prince later. Months later I still hadn’t done it, until I saw jewelry designer Anthony Roussel‘s work on Design-Milk the other day and jettisoned over his site to check out more :

First, I was all holy crap, that’s gorgeous. And then I realized something about his work looked familiar, and the gears started turning.

I smell some inspiration, don’t you? And by reading more about Mr. Roussel’s work, you’ll notice that he has a “passion for modern architecture”. Personally, I love his work. It’s gorgeous. And it’s a great way to be able to wear that beautiful architectural vibe of Mr. Prince when you can’t afford to live there, especially tweaked to fit on the human body.

Love them both!

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Hello my little robot friends!

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I’m kind of smitten by Stephane Halleux‘s found object robot-esque creations:

“I like crazy mixtures, unlikely associations, advanced technology mixed with mechanisms of long ago. I’ve always been fascinated by robotics, its advantages and contradictions. The importance of robotisation and its increasing influence on mankind. Who never dreamt of owning a robot able to do the dirty work. But where are the bounds? How far is a robot useful to men and when does it begin endangering their life ? That’s what I want to make: caricatures of robots that have gone beyond the limits, all that with a fanciful vision of the future. The future we imagined some years ago: big computers full of cables with warning lights everywhere. That’s what I like: an old fashioned universe’s future.” -Stephane Halleux via

Frankly, I love that: an old fashioned universe’s future. I kind of want to adopt it.

They look like they popped out of some amazing fantasy stop motion film. They would be amazing in something like that because the amount of character and life in his work truly sets my heart aflutter. I really love the found objects and metals combined with the stitched together leather. Seriously, swoon.

The level of work that went into these is phenomenal. Please do go to his site where you can see them (and many, many others) in further detail.

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